7 Common Reverb Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

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7 Common Reverb Mistakes and How to Avoid Them


7 Mar, 2023


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Mixing is a skill that every producer and mixing engineer has to learn in order to get the best results from their music. Some mixing mistakes are easy to avoid, while others can be avoided by following some simple guidelines. In this article we will go over 7 common reverb mixing mistakes and how you can avoid them so that your mixes sound more professional.

  1. Not knowing when to use reverb. How to avoid it: When mixing, always ask yourself what the goal of the reverb is. If you are trying to make a vocal sound more intimate, then you would want to use a smaller room or hall reverb. If you are trying to create a sense of space in your mix, then you would want to use a larger hall or plate reverb. By knowing what type of reverbs will work best for each situation, you can avoid using too much or too little reverb and get better sounding mixes.

  2. Using too much reverb. How to avoid it: This mistake is often made by beginners who don't know how to use reverb properly. When using too much reverb, you can make your mix sound washed out and muddled. To avoid this, start by dialing in a small amount of reverb and then increase it until you reach the desired effect.

  3. Not mixing reverbs correctly. How to avoid it: This mistake is often made when people are using multiple reverbs in their mixes. If each reverb isn't mixed correctly, they will compete with each other and create a mess. To avoid this, start by EQing each reverb differently so that they don't overlap. You may also want to adjust the levels of each reverb so that they are all at the same relative level in your mix.

  4. Using too many reverb types in a single song/ingredients list [Not mixing reverbs correctly.]. Examples: adding reverb to specific tracks for certain effects, such as a snare or hi hat plate reverb, using an algorithmic and convolution verb together on the same track, not knowing when to use different verbs i.e., room vs hall etc.. How to avoid it: You can avoid making this mistake by sticking with just one type of reverb at a time per mixing session. For example, if you are mixing drums then only add drum overheads and close microphones that have been recorded through rooms or halls onto separate tracks for mixing. If you are mixing a guitar, only add reverb to the track that was recorded through a guitar amp. This will help keep your mix sounding more cohesive and professional.

  5. Not using reverbs in moderation. How to avoid it: When adding reverbs to your mix, always use them in moderation. Too much reverb can make your mix sound muddy and washed out. Start by adding a small amount of reverb and then increase it until you reach the desired effect.

  6. Not placing reverbs in different parts of your mix [EQing reverbs incorrectly.]. Mixing vocals with reverb for an entire song instead of just adding it where needed i.e., vocal verses and choruses only. Not creating space between elements such as drums and cymbals when they have been recorded through rooms or halls. How to avoid it: always use reverb during specific parts of a song/script rather than throughout its entirety. For example, if you're mixing a vocal performance that has been recorded with an overhead microphone in a room, only add reverb when the vocals are being sung. If your recording is dry for most of it and then goes into a larger space during certain parts such as choruses or verses, try adding some subtle reverb to these sections without making them sound washed out. You can also avoid this mistake by taking time to experiment with different reverbs on each element of your mix before committing to one type.

  7. Not using reverbs at all. How to avoid it: When mixing audio, always use reverbs in order to create a more realistic and spacious sounding mix. Even if you are mixing a voiceover that was recorded in a studio, adding some subtle reverb can help create more of an ambiance and make it sound less dry.